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Trevor Summers, accused of holding wife in captivity, to remain jailed

Trevor Summers’ lawyer did not challenge the request.

Trevor Summers’ lawyer did not challenge the request.

TAMPA — Trevor Summers, who is accused of kidnapping his estranged wife, holding her against her will for two days and trying to kill her, will not be getting out of jail anytime soon.

Summers, 39, was scheduled to appear Monday morning for a bond hearing, but his public defender said he would not challenge a prosecutor's request that he be held in jail.

His wife, Alisa Summers, attended the brief court hearing, flanked by a victim's advocate from the Hillsborough State Attorney's Office.

She watched as Circuit Judge Mark Kiser granted the prosecutor's request for an order finding that Trevor Summers is a danger to the community and should be held without bail. He will remain behind bars pending the resolution of his criminal charges.

"I wanted to see it for myself," Alisa Summers said afterward. "I wanted to be sure that he's not getting out."

Last week, prosecutors requested that Summers remain in jail after they provided details of the allegations against him in a court document.

The document said Summers held his wife, Alisa Summers, 37, in captivity for two days, tying her to a bed with rope and Christmas tree lights, holding a pillow over her face until she lost consciousness, and driving her around rural Florida as he searched for a charter boat to take them to sea.

When sheriff's deputies located the couple at a Ruskin waterfront resort, Trevor Summers attempted to kill himself by cutting his neck with a knife, authorities said.

In an SUV he was driving, deputies found a suicide note he had penned to their five children. He lamented the divorce and told the children he would be watching them with their mother "from heaven."

Alisa Summers, standing before a scrum of TV reporters Monday, declined to discuss her children. She said she plans to be in court as her husband's case moves toward trial. She wants to be an advocate for women in abusive relationships.

"I want to just reach out to other women that are in that situation and to tell them to reach out and find people to surround yourself with," she said. "A lot of times in domestic abuse you're isolated. . . . I consider myself lucky to be alive."

Trevor Summers, accused of holding wife in captivity, to remain jailed 03/20/17 [Last modified: Monday, March 20, 2017 7:42pm]
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