Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Kriseman and Baker trade jabs at mayoral debate - not, this time, the crowd

St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman, center, addresses the crowd as Pastor Clarence Williams, right, looks on Thursday. Kriseman’s chief challenger, Rick Baker, is on the left.

LARA CERRI | Times

St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman, center, addresses the crowd as Pastor Clarence Williams, right, looks on Thursday. Kriseman’s chief challenger, Rick Baker, is on the left.

ST. PETERSBURG — Before the mayoral forum began Thursday, Pastor Clarence Williams urged a standing-room-only crowd to behave civilly.

"Be mindful of the rules and be mindful of your neighbors," Williams told the crowd of about 250 people in the worship hall at Greater Mount Zion AME Church in Midtown.

Unlike Monday's mayhem- filled debate at the Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, there were no long outbursts. This debate didn't end in a shoving match.

But it did get rough.

Mayor Rick Kriseman and former Mayor Rick Baker wrestled over the city's sewage crisis, police brutality, effectiveness of the South St. Petersburg Community Redevelopment Area and affordable housing, among other topics.

Kriseman said serving as a state House representative with fellow Democrats Frank Peterman and Darryl Rouson taught him to fight against the establishment.

He said he was not part of the establishment as mayor, but was "fighting for the people," especially on jobs and restoring felony rights.

Baker said the city was near greatness and needed better management. He criticized the mayor for closing the Albert Whitted sewage plant.

"A 10-year-old could tell you if you close down Albert Whitted, you dump sewage," Baker said.

Kriseman said problems with the city's troubled system were evident under Baker. The mayor said Wednesday that he was taking the difficult step to repair the sewers to avoid spills, including 50,000 gallons of "mostly treated" sewage.

A member of the audience asked why all of the six qualified candidates shouldn't be allowed to participate in the July 25 debate sponsored by the Tampa Bay Times and Bay News 9. The sponsors announced Thursday that attendance at the Palladium event would be by invitation only. Kriseman and Baker are the only two candidates invited.

"Now it's just two-headed Rick talking to his own people," said the International People's Democratic Uhuru Movement-associated candidate Jesse Nevel. He challenged Baker and Kriseman to boycott the event.

Neither did. Baker said he would debate whoever showed up. Kriseman was noncommittal.

Both Baker and Kriseman used a chance to give closing statements to make their pitch to end the race in August.

Baker drove home his support for the public schools.

"Schools should be a major focus of the mayor of St. Petersburg," Baker said.

Kriseman told the crowd that his vision of a city was to create one of opportunity.

"It really is about being for everyone," Kriseman said. "Everyone should have the same opportunities."

It was an impassioned speech that sounded much like Baker's often-repeated dream of a seamless city.

Two other candidates, Theresa "Momma Tee" Lassiter and Anthony Cates III used the greater amount of time — without disruptions — to highlight their long-shot candidacies.

Lassiter pointed to her quarter-century of activism and her campaign theme of unity. She drew applause when she advocated redrawing the lines of the South St. Petersburg CRA to include the lucrative redevelopment possibilities of Tropicana Field's 85 acres.

Responding to a question about reducing auto theft, Cates said he and fellow activist Lewis Stephens had recruited 170 young people and obtained jobs and college opportunities for them without any city help.

"I'm 100 percent for the people," Cates said.

Paul "The Truth" Congemi is also on the ballot. He told the Times that an illness in the family had kept him from recent debates. A seventh candidate, Ernisa Barnwell, was disqualified this week for not paying her qualifying fee. She has said she'll fight that decision, but didn't participate at Thursday's forum.

If no candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote in the Aug. 29 primary, the top two vote-getters will proceed to the Nov. 7 election.

The evening proved a victory for Williams, who playfully engaged the crowd throughout the night. He had predicted the Uhurus, and their chairman, Omali Yeshitela, wouldn't shut down the event. They didn't.

After one particularly long round of applause, Williams reminded the crowd to follow the rules.

"Amen. Amen," Yeshitela said in a booming voice.

At end of the debate, Williams called Yeshitela to the podium, where he thanked him for inspiring young people and getting them interested in the political process.

Williams and Yeshitela then embraced.

Mayoral debate sponsors change format

ST. PETERSBURG — The Tampa Bay Times and Bay News 9 have announced a change to their co-sponsored mayoral debate.

"Due to security concerns, the Tampa Bay Times and Bay News 9 are changing the format of our July 25 mayoral debate to ensure that it is a safe and productive event," Times spokeswoman Sherri Day said in a statement Thursday, three days after disruption by protesters cut short a candidate forum.

"The debate will be invitation-only, with tickets going to the campaigns of the participating candidates and event sponsors. Our goal is to create an environment that is free of disruption and conducive to the exchange of information between the two leading candidates."

The hourlong debate between current Mayor Rick Kriseman and former Mayor Rick Baker is scheduled for 7 p.m. at the Palladium theater. The moderators will be Times political editor Adam C. Smith and Bay News 9 anchor Holly Gregory. It will be broadcast live on Bay News 9 and online at tampabay.com.

Kriseman and Baker trade jabs at mayoral debate - not, this time, the crowd 07/14/17 [Last modified: Friday, July 14, 2017 8:09am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Marriott opening new hotel on Clearwater Beach

    Tourism

    CLEARWATER BEACH — A dual-branded Marriott hotel with a tongue-twister name is opening on Clearwater Beach in August. The Residence Inn Tampa Clearwater Beach and SpringHill Suites Tampa Clearwater Beach will have 255 suites total, connected by a lobby.

    A dual-branded Marriott hotel called the Residence Inn Tampa Clearwater Beach and SpringHill Suites Tampa Clearwater Beach will open in August in Clearwater Beach. Pictured is a rendering.
[Courtesy of Hayworth PR]
  2. AARP study explores the role 50-plus moviegoers play at the box office

    Life Times

    A new study shows that seniors have a much larger impact on the success — or failure — of a film than previously realized, even films that might seem aimed at a much younger audience.

    Matthew Liebmann is senior vice president — the Americas of New Zealand-based Movio.
  3. Want elite college football athletes? Recruit Tampa Bay

    Blogs

    Now that college football watch list season is over (I think), here's one takeaway you probably already knew: Tampa Bay produces a lot of great athletes.

    Robinson High produuct Byron Pringle has gone from this performance in a high school all-star game to all-Big 12 at Kansas State.
  4. A heart-shaped box containing Katie Golden's ashes sits next to her picture at her family's South Tampa home. Katie died from a drug overdose in April 2017. She was only 17-years-old. Read about her parents' journey at tampabay.com. [ALESSANDRA DA PRA | Times]
  5. Hillsong Young and Free's worship music is a lot like pop. That's no accident.

    Music & Concerts

    Press play on Hillsong Young and Free's Youth Revival, and everything you hear might sound familiar.

    Hillsong Young and Free are performing at Jannus Live in St. Petersburg on Saturday. Credit: Rogers and Cowan